October 27, 2005

Software review: Xcelsius XL

As published in Computer Shopper:
"Creating glossy Microsoft Excel charts for your presentations is all well and good, but your static charts and graphs won't help much if your boss wants to play 'What if?' with the projected fourth-quarter sales. XCelsius XL ($195 for the Standard version, $495 for the Professional) lets you do just that, allowing you to add sliders, checkboxes, clickable maps, and guages to your charts and graphs for tweaking the numbers and creating alternate scenarios on the fly."
Used with permission from Computer Shopper. Copyright 2005.

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News story: Nanotech inching toward LCD reality

As published in Mobile magazine:
"Sick of hearing how nanotechnology -- that much talked about yet impenetrably arcane field of microscience -- is going to change the face of technology as we know it, someday, maybe? Before you write off all things nano as so much science fiction, meet our new friend, the nanotube: a teeny, tiny particle that's about to bear some eye-popping fruit."
Used with permission from Mobile magazine. Copyright 2005.

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October 26, 2005

Wireless review: BlackBerry 7100g

As published on CNET.com:
"Research in Motion's slim, lightweight 7100 series makes its way to Cingular Wireless with the arrival of the RIM BlackBerry 7100g. Nearly identical to T-Mobile's BlackBerry 7100t, this new addition to the 7100 family boasts the same quasi-QWERTY keypad, the ability to sync with corporate servers and POP/Web e-mail clients, and a refreshingly compact form factor. That said, the reasonably priced 7100g ($299; $199 with a two-year service plan) comes saddled with some of the same limitations: Bluetooth that's restricted to headsets only, no onboard chat client, and a keypad that can be tricky to master. However, those who want on-the-go access to their e-mail without being weighted down by a hefty device will likely warm to the RIM BlackBerry 7100g--as long as they're willing to deal with the keypad's learning curve."
Used with permission from CNET Networks, Inc. Copyright 2005.

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October 24, 2005

Wireless review: Nextel Motorola i355

As published on CNET.com:
"Looking to crawl around a quarry, climb Mount Everest, or weave your way though the jungle? Here's a phone that's ready to tag along. The rugged, ready-for-anything Nextel Motorola i355 may be bulky and heavy, but it won't have any trouble surviving the elements. This GPS-enabled handset boasts Nextel's Direct Connect and Group Connect functionality, a decent color screen, and a speakerphone, plus a rubberized plastic shell that resists rain, dust, and heat--and even survives drops onto a hard surface."
Used with permission from CNET Networks, Inc. Copyright 2005.

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October 21, 2005

Home video review: Sony RDR-VX515

As published on CNET.com:
"Chronic tape collectors looking to archive their epic-length VHS cassettes to DVD will rejoice with the arrival of Sony's RDR-VX515 ($400 list), the first VHS-DVD combo recorder we've seen that supports double-layer blank DVDs. Each DVD+R double-layer disc is capable of storing 4 hours of video in SP mode and as much as 16 hours in the lowest-quality SEP mode. This quad-format (DVD+R/+RW/-R/-RW) deck boasts solid editing options and easy-to-use menus, but it also has its share of shortcomings. The most surprising is the deck's middling VHS-to-DVD dubbing quality, which falls short of less expensive competing decks, including the Panasonic DMR-ES30V or the Lite-On LVC-9006. Neither of those can do double-layer, however, so if you're looking to dub your extralong VHS tapes to disc, the Sony RDR-VX515 is the only game in town."
Used with permission from CNET Networks, Inc. Copyright 2005.

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October 05, 2005

PVP review: Archos Gmini 402

As published on CNET.com:
"Archos makes a great personal video player (PVP) even better with the Gmini 402, an impressive update--if not a wholesale revision--to last year's top-notch Gmini400. Just like its predecessor, the 402 ($330) packs in plenty of features, such as video and MP3/WMA playback, photo storage and image viewing, voice and in-line recording, and gaming via the popular Mophun engine. But this time, we also get support for Windows Media Player syncing, including DRM-protected music and video. However, the 402 isn't without its problems: It's saddled with poor viewing angles on its otherwise gorgeous 2.2-inch LCD, so-so battery life, less-than-stellar volume, and lack of direct video recording, but considering the Gmini is nearly small enough to fit in a jeans pocket, we're still duly impressed."
Used with permission from CNET Networks, Inc. Copyright 2005.

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