February 17, 2006

Wireless review: T-Mobile MDA

As published on CNET.com:
"Armed with built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, a slide-out QWERTY keyboard, EDGE support, and Windows Mobile 5, the nondescript T-Mobile MDA--a rebranded version of the HTC Wizard--makes for an enticing addition to T-Mobile's staid lineup of long-in-the-tooth handhelds. As one of CNET's editors put it, it's like a Sidekick for grown-ups. Indeed, this unassuming-looking phone makes it easy to jump on to available hot spots, manage your messages, open and edit Office documents, and crank your tunes. Unfortunately, the MDA ($399) is without any new tricks or spectacular performance, and since it's hobbled by a subpar keypad and an iffy camera, it will have to fight against heavyweights such as the Palm Treo 700w, the Sprint PPC-6700, and the Cingular 8125 for attention."
Used with permission from CNET Networks, Inc. Copyright 2006.

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February 10, 2006

Wireless review: Kyocera Jet for Amp'd Mobile

As published on CNET.com:
"Mobile multimedia junkies will find plenty of eye and ear candy in the Kyocera Jet, the company's new 3G slider for newcomer carrier Amp'd Mobile. This all-black, EV-DO-enabled handset boasts a slick media player that taps into the Amp'd video and music store, plus a 128MB TransFlash card for storing all your songs and video clips. Unfortunately, the Jet is saddled with an underwhelming VGA camera, a small and annoying keypad, and a tendency to freeze at inopportune moments. While the phone's bargain-basement $100 price tag sweetens the pill--making it one of the cheapest, no-contract 3G phones we've seen--those looking for a powerhouse 3G phone from Amp'd Mobile should wait for the Hollywood, a rebranded version of Motorola's impressive E815 with a 1.3-megapixel camera and Bluetooth, which will be available in the first quarter of 2006."
Used with permission from CNET Networks, Inc. Copyright 2006.

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February 09, 2006

Personal video review: Archos Gmini 402 Camcorder

As published on CNET.com:
"We gave the original Archos Gmini 402 high marks, but now that this updated model packs a VGA camcorder and a 1.3-megapixel still camera, we're even more impressed. (For more on this impressive line, see the original Gmini400.) For $370, or $250 for the noncamera version, the 20GB Gmini 402 still plays back video and MP3/WMA files; stores and displays photos; records voice and line-level audio sources; supports games running on the popular Mophun engine; and syncs regular or DRM-protected music and video from Windows Media Player. And while its integrated camcorder can't compete with a stand-alone model, the 402's recorded video quality works fine for casual use."
Used with permission from CNET Networks, Inc. Copyright 2006.

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February 02, 2006

Home audio review: Think Outside Boomtube H2O1

As published on CNET.com:
"If Think Outside's Boomtube H2O1 looks familiar, you may have been paying attention when Virgin Electronics was still around: The H2O1 is actually the acquired version of the Boomtube EX. Think Outside purchased the design when Virgin Electronics was dissolved, and that design is enticing indeed. Your musically inclined buddies will drool when you set up the silver, eye-catching Boomtube, but their faces might fall as their ears strain for the promised heart-stopping bass. A thick, heavy metal tube with remote speakers that unscrew from either end, the 'Tube is certainly unique; unfortunately, we could have done with a bit more boom, a cleaner cable setup, and a discount on the steep $200 price tag."
Used with permission from CNET Networks, Inc. Copyright 2006.

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February 01, 2006

Feature: Emergency cell phone chargers: power in a pinch

As published on CNET.com:
"Imagine that your car just broke down on the highway during morning rush hour. It's raining, and you pull out your cell phone to a tow truck--only to hear a sad chirp from your handset as the battery dies. It's an all too plausible scenario, especially for those of us who aren't so conscientious about charging our phones. That's why we recommend tossing an emergency cell phone charger into your glove box, your suitcase, or anywhere else it might come in handy. These little cranks, battery boosters, and even solar chargers can give your depleted handset a few extra minutes of juice--just enough to call a friend, dial a tow truck, or even notify the police. We've reviewed five of the latest models and rated them for portability, ease of use and reliability. Find out which one is right for you."
Used with permission from CNET Networks, Inc. Copyright 2006.

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